Last weekend I took a drive up to central Vermont to do some hiking/anting in addition to relaxing. 

I looked mostly in and around a large grove of white pines. All ants were identified using the keys in A Field Guide to the Ants of New England.
 
The temperature was low 70s with a partly cloudy sky.
 
Myrmica sp. AF-scu

 
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These ants were common on the inside edges of the grove. Where present they were dense and very active.
 
 
Stenamma brevicorne
 
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I found 5 colonies of this ant. All of the colonies were within rotting branches that were partially submerged in the pine needle mat. The only workers I saw foraging were very close to the colony.
 
Aphaenogaster picea
 
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I did not find this ant in the pine grove but they were very common outside of it. 
 
Leptothorax sp. AF-can
 
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I found this ant on the edge of a meadow nearby. Only this single worker was found. This is my first encounter with this genus.
 
I plant to go back there and try and collect and observe some of the undescribed species.
 
Also common in the pine grove was Camponotus pennsylvanicus, and outside and in the boarder Lasius neoniger was common.

 

Cerapachys JTL-002

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Formica rubicunda journal

I keep a journal of my pet ants over at antfarm.yuku.com . The species is a obligate parasite of Formica fusca-group species. Once established in the wild the species will perform raids onto the host species to steal the brood. Every so often I need to go out and find some of the host species brood to give to the parasite in order to keep the colony stable.

View the journal here: http://antfarm.yuku.com/topic/14821/Formica-rubicunda-journal

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